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27 Feb 2015 The 2015 South African Hobie 16 Nationals
25 Feb 2015 2015 EHCA Hobie regatta calendar
22 Feb 2015 Balladares, Magsanay Defend Philippines Hobie 16 Nationals Championship
21 Feb 2015 13th Punta Fuego Regatta Philippines
20 Feb 2015 South African Hobie 14 Western Cape Provincial Championships
20 Feb 2015 2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals
17 Feb 2015 2015 Hobie 16 North American Championships
11 Feb 2015 Sail the Gulf 2015
9 Feb 2015 Italian Hobie Multiclass Nationals announced
7 Feb 2015 It is with great sadness the IHCA announces the passing of Tony 'Dingo' Laurent
2 Feb 2015 Hobie MultiWorlds and Hobie 16 Europeans NOR released
27 Jan 2015 2015 Hobie Mid-Winter East North America
23 Jan 2015 2015 South African Hobie 14 Championships
20 Jan 2015 North American Hobie 18,20 Tiger and Wild Cat Championships cancelled
20 Jan 2015 Hobie Cat Announces Videos Produced by Gary Jobson
16 Jan 2015 HCANA announces the dates for the North American Championships for Hobie 17, Hobie Wave, Hobie 14 and Hobie 16
14 Jan 2015 Hobie Dragoon Charter boats for 2015 Hobie MultiWorlds
11 Dec 2014 Hobie Cat Europe Charter boat program 2015 Multi-Worlds & H16 Europeans
7 Dec 2014 Hobie 16 Pre Europeans Clinic
15 Sep 2014 2014 Open Danish Hobie Cat 16 Nationals concluded
 

The 2015 South African Hobie 16 Nationals


The South African Hobie 16 Nationals
David Brookes, Friday, 27 February 2015

The Hobie 16 Nationals 2015 - Friday 3 April 2015 to Monday 6 April 2015 We are proud to announce that Durban will be hosting this prestigious event and would like to take this opportunity to thank our main sponsors – Point Yacht Club, Health Technology and Entek.
We look forward to hosting the event and ask that you all promote it to your clubs, friends and family. Please note the inclusion of an open class (non-nationals) race for Hobie cats as well, this will cater for Hobie 14 and Dragoon entries. Please visit this link
http://www.hobiecatkzn.co.za/…/inde…/Hobie-16-Nationals-2015 

for more information.

 

2015 EHCA Hobie regatta calendar


2015 European Calendar
David Brookes, Wednesday, 25 February 2015

The current 2015 EHCA Hobie regatta calendar has been updated with Hobie racing all throughout Europe allowing all the sailors some great regattas to attend

Other Links
 web site
 European Calendar PDF

 

Balladares, Magsanay Defend Philippines Hobie 16 Nationals Championship


2015 Philippines Hobie 16 Nationals
Rap Garcia, Sunday, 22 February 2015

Philippine Sailing Association’s Ridgely Balladares (helm) and Richly Magsanay (crew) zipped past all the other Hobie 16 teams in the Lighthouse Marina Resort Hobie Nationals in Subic last February 6-8, thus defending the championship they won last year.

Balladares secured their spot by the sixth of the seven-race tilt, and afforded to retire the last race with a still clear seven-point lead over second-placer Mike Ngu (helm) and Boyet Magsanay (crew).

Ten local teams competed in this year’s Hobie Nationals, which was a different kind of challenge given the light winds that prevailed during most of the races.

Such challenge shook up the usual placing of teams that regularly compete with each other, even ending up with a four-way tie for third place after the first day of racing. Maria and Joe Hagedorn eventually got the third place after all the scores were computed on the second day.
The Lighthouse Marina Resort Hobie Nationals is part of the AboitizPower Cleanergy Travelers Series that aims to bring sailing to different parts of the country.

Participants and guests were checked-in at the sailors’ favorite, Lighthouse Marina Resort in Subic Bay , a 34-room boutique hotel capped by a lighthouse. The Lighthouse was established back in 2007 to provide transient residence to executives of business locators of the Subic free port zone; and for tourists who frequent the port more for its sailing and eco-tourism than its business.

The event was also supported by Regatta clothing, the Subic sailing club SAGS, Bayfront Hotel and Terrace Hotel, Subic Bay Hats and Visitors Board, Subic Bay Freeport Chamber of Commerce, and SBMA.


2015 Philippines Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 Philippines Hobie 16 Nationals
 

13th Punta Fuego Regatta Philippines


13th Punta Fuego Regatta
Photograph:Club Punta Fuego/ Punta Fuego Yacht Club
Santi Picornell and Rap Garcia, Saturday, 21 February 2015

With northeast winds ranging from 20 to 35 knots and a record of 17 Hobies in two classes, the 13th Punta Fuego Regatta held at Club Punta Fuego, Nasugbu last January 24-25, proved challenging despite the omission of its traditional Fortune Island Race due to safety reasons.  
The Punta Fuego Regatta is the first major regatta in the Philippine sailing calendar, with its points counting towards the AboitizPower Cleanergy Travelers Series event, and one of its much-awaited parts is the said 14 nm Fortune Island race.
Due to the record number of 11 Hobie 16s and 6 Getaways that signed up for the race alongside 4 other boat classes, International Race Officer Jerry Rollin instead sent the fleet to race the same distance north and south along the picturesque Batangas coast rounding several islands for the morning race.
A lunch prepared at Terrazas de Punta Fuego, a seaside beach destination 3 nautical miles away from the Punta Fuego Yacht Club, revitalised the sailors from the morning’s draining race.  A windward leeward for some and a race back to PFYC completed the racing for the first day.  
Mike Ngu and Boyet Magsanay took the top position in the Hobie 16 class despite capsizing several times to win the gruelling first race, while the Hobie 16 team of Eddie Legarda and Edwin Lucero had to drop the race after a problem with their jib. They had to return to shore and get a new boat—a Getaway—with which they continued the race.
 
The second day of racing saw the winds drop 10 knots to a respectable 20 knots and after a difficult race the previous day, a combination of windward leewards and island passage races completed the perfect weekend of racing for all classes.  
 
Highlight of the regatta was the first time participation of 5 ocean catamarans between 40ft-50ft with most reaching record speeds for their skippers.  
Mike Ngu and Boyet Magsanay took the Hobie 16 class win, adding their names on the perpetual trophy of the13th edition of the Punta Fuego Regatta. Eddie Legarda and Edwin Lucero won in the Getaway class.
 
Honor Roll
Hobie 16:
1.         Mike Ngu / Boyet Magsanay
2.         Maria Hagedorn / Joey Hagedorn
3.         Denise Cruz / Arnel Ornales
 
Hobie Getaway:
1.         Eddie Legarda / Edwin Lucero
2.         Jojo Silverio / Santi Picornell
3.         Philip Hagedorn / Cons Castaneda

 


13th Punta Fuego Regatta

13th Punta Fuego Regatta
 

South African Hobie 14 Western Cape Provincial Championships


Hobie 14 WC Provincial Champion 2015 Douglas Edwards
John Ryall, Friday, 20 February 2015

The Hobie 14 Western Cape Provincial Championships held at TSC over the week end of the 14th and 15th February was officially a ‘Ripper’ !
The encouraging thing is that Hobie 14 sailing is alive and well in South Africa. With 22 entries in the recent Hobie 14 Nationals in Knysna 500km down the road and only an overlap of 4 common entries this means 31 active boats in the Western Cape, plus at least 21 in Natal (as per their 2014 Provincials) and 10 in Gauteng (which means we have 62 Hobie 14’s being actively sailed. The other encouraging fact is that of the 13 entries we had in the WC Champs 7 were younger sailors which bodes well for the future. Only Matthew Whitehead and Nic Ryall (injured) were missing of the younger generation. Ages ranged from 14 to 71 ! When you consider that you can buy a decent second-hand Hobie 14 on a trailer in South Africa for about R 10,000 (USD$ 850) and have endless fun with it, it really is a bargain.

TSC put on a good show as usual and we were blessed with Neville (Lucky) Norton as our race officer extraordinaire. Ably assisted by Di Norton, Matthew and the ever blue ‘Sparkle’ Neville has a direct line to the top as he always seems to come up trumps with the wind. 10 races tell the story. Light southerly winds were forecast on both Saturday and Sunday but from race 3 onwards it was full trapezing conditions I estimate that it topped 20 knots on the Saturday and at least 25 knots on the Sunday.. Even though it was blowing strongly there were enough shifts in the wind on Saturday to make it interesting with a tack immediately after the leeward mark being favoured and getting you to the windward mark sometimes ahead of the boats who had made it in just two legs in spite of this inshore route requiring an additional two tacks (something not to be undertaken lightly on a 14). The wind direction forecast on the Sunday showed it starting as ESE and swinging to the South and that is exactly what it did do.

The problem with yachting dynasties is just that, they are dynasties. All of us having breathed a sigh of relief that neither Blaine Dodds or William Edwards had entered we then came up against the next Edwards generation in the form of Douglas who sailed brilliantly to record a convincing win. He had a small stutter when he was OCS (by miles) in Race 5 and recorded a 4th in Race 6 but came back strongly on day two recording ‘bullets’ in 3 out of the 4 races held. He even managed to claw back a win on the very last leg by 10m in race 7 after being well behind for all the race. Douglas was followed by another member of a yachting family, Robert de Rooy who surprised us all by making a special guest appearance and sailing into a solid second place. Robert is hardly a regular sailor yet he showed speed and composure on the water in his old brown Hobie 14. Whenever you looked around there he was challenging for a top position.

 Finishes were downwind which was different and allowed us another beat – often 5 to 6 boats finishing within 10 seconds of each other. Klaas de Rooy was his normal consistent self never dropping below 8th. A newcomer to Hobie 14 Sailing was Brent Hayward (SA ISAF Youth Rep in 2013) who through the kind efforts of Dave Power managed to get one of the FHBSC club Hobie 14’s going and on the water. It was very interesting to see an obviously talented sailor learning how to sail a 14. Tacking was not his forte except when I tried to cross in front of him while he was tacking to lay the weather mark and that time he did it perfectly ! A 360 was the result ! Wrapping your mainsheet around your rudder blade when bearing off in a strong wind for the weather mark is also not a fast option. We look forward to seeing Brent on a 14 again. Daniel Lawrence, son of former Hobie 14 World Champion, Allan sailed Johnnie van der Vyver’s 14 to 7th place but his report card should read ‘could do better’. Last year’s Provincial Champion Steve Searle was a very welcome late, late entry having told us that he would not be able to sail this year

Other Links
 Results

 

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals


2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals
David Brookes, Friday, 20 February 2015

The New Zealand Hobie 16 Naionals was a great success. Conducted by the Manly Sailing Club, Whangaparaoa there was varied weather conditions. Sailors from New Zealand, Korea, Australia and New Caledonia giving the true international feel.

Thanks to all for travelling and enjoying the New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals.   

Other Links
 Results


2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals

2015 New Zealand Hobie 16 Nationals
 

2015 Hobie 16 North American Championships


2015 North American Hobie 16 Championship
David Brookes, Tuesday, 17 February 2015

September 20 to 25 at Pensacola Yacht Club

2015 Hobie 16 North American Championships September 20 to 25 at Pensacola Yacht Club.

Registration
19th September 14:00 to 17:00
20th September 10:00 to 17:00
21st September 08:00 to 09:00

Practice races
Tentative PM 20th September

Racing
21st to 23rd September
Round Robin (four groups, two starts per race)
24th to 25th September
Gold and Silver Fleet racing

Other Links
 Notice of Race

 

Sail the Gulf 2015


2015 Sail the Gulf
David Brookes, Wednesday, 11 February 2015

The 2015 Sail the Gulf hosted by Qatar Sailing and Rowing Federation was a great success.  9 entries from 8 different countries produced a truly international flavor.  The podium had 3 different countries with India taking out the top spot.
Qatar Sailing and Rowing Federation provided the professional organization it is renowned for. The international sailors already indicting they will be back for some more quality racing and Qatar hospitality.
Qatar Sailing and Rowing Federation  provided charter boats for the sailors.

 

 

Other Links
 Results


2015 Sail the Gulf

2015 Sail the Gulf

2015 Sail the Gulf

2015 Sail the Gulf
 

Italian Hobie Multiclass Nationals announced


2015 Italian Hobie MultiClass Championships
David Brookes, Monday, 9 February 2015

The Italian Hobie Class Association is pleased to announce the Italian Hobie Championships for the Hobie 16, Tiger, Wild Cat and Dragoon classes Compagnia Della Vela Grosseto.

A perfect warm up for the Hobie MultiWorlds and Hobie 16 Europeans

Thursday 9th July registration and measurement
Friday 10th July registration and measurement and racing
Saturday 11th July racing
Sunday 12th July Racing and prize giving

Other Links
 Notice of Race
 Accommodation
 Organazing Authority

 

It is with great sadness the IHCA announces the passing of Tony 'Dingo' Laurent


Tony Laurent
David Brookes, Saturday, 7 February 2015

It is with great sadness the IHCA announces the passing of Hobie sailor Tony ‘Dingo’ Laurent. Tony while remembered as the person who sailed the Hobie 18 across the Atlantic he did so much more in Hobie sailing and beyond. He was also a passionate Hobie sailor competing in many  Hobie World, European, National Championships and Hog's Breath 1000. Tony continued after his Hobie sailing to Julies Venrne Challenge, around the world and cross Atlantic Races. 

After moving to Airlie Beach on the Whitsunday Region with his wife Lolita and daughter Jessie. Tony set up a success business and was the Airlie Beach Chamber of Commerce President.

Whatever Tony did he put 100% effort into the project. Tony ‘Dingo’ Laurent will be missed by all that have privilege to race with and against  and to know him. The IHCA passes on our most sincere condolences to Lolita (also a Hobie sailor from New Caledonia) and Jessie Laurent.

This is his incredible story of sailing a Hobie 18 across the Atlantic Ocean 

Tony Laurent and Daniel Prada Across the Atlantic on an Open Hobie 18 Catamaran
October 1986
The following is reprinted from Hobie Hotline  

Editor's Note: The HOBIE HOTLINE is printing the following story for two reasons. First, it is a remarkable adventure, one of the most incredible journeys ever attempted on a Hobie Cat and we would be remiss by not including it. We hope you enjoy it and thrill with the sailors and their amazing achievement, a milestone in ocean crossings.
Secondly, it is also a warning. Hobie Cat and the HOTLINE do not endorse offshore Hobie sailing. Hobie Cats were made to sail within sight of land whether in the ocean or on a lake. Some specially controlled events such as the Hog's Breath 1000 include offshore sailing, but the safety measures are extraordinary. Tony Laurent, profiled in the January/February 1987 issue, is one of the most experienced Hobie sailors in the world. Daniel Pradel is a seasoned French sailor and veteran of many races, including a lot of Hobie sailing experience. The two men thought they were prepared. We hope others who may be planning such adventures take note.
 

By Noelle Duck
Both passionate sailors had already gathered in victories and trophies. But they dreamed of the impossible: traversing the Atlantic Ocean from Dakar, Senegal on Africa’s west coast, to Pointe a Pitre, Guadeloupe, part of the French Antilles in the Caribbean. An Atlantic crossing is always a touch and go affair in a sailboat, but Tony Laurent and Daniel Pradel were going to try the journey on a Hobie 18 Magnum. They left Dakar on November 12, 1986 at 8:30 in the morning. On a peaceful, windy Sunday 18 days later, a local sailor, Mr. Guegen, was doing some chores on his boat in the Basse Terre Marina on Guadeloupe when he spotted two exhausted sailors gliding into port. The impending arrival of the team had been announced by French Overseas Radio, so Guegen knew who the two were.
"You want some help?" he asked with concern. ''We’re bloody hungry." was the weak reply. With that exchange, the two sailors had completed what many thought to be impossible. They had traversed the Atlantic on an open, 18-foot catamaran. But the price they paid was great. Laurent and Pradel had often thought about crossing the Atlantic on a Hobie Cat separately Then, one July night, Laurent told Pradel he had a "crazy project" to talk about. Pradel replied that he, too, had been thinking of something crazy After deciding who was to speak first, only two words were said: "Atlantic Ocean." They decided on late autumn and chose the course from Senegal to the French West Indies, a route that had the reputation of being "easy," a route American slave ships travelled in the 17th and 18th centuries because fresh trade winds and calm waters made the going fast and uneventful. "Once you have passed the Cape Verde Islands, you'll see that the sea becomes peaceful and that it will rock you to your destination," said their friends. By the time Pradel and Laurent were making final preparations on their boat, which rested on the beach of N'Gor at Dakar, they were dreaming of the sweet regularity of the trades, still mild at this time of year, that were to push them all the way to Guadeloupe.

On the beach at the Meridien Hotel of N'Gor, the Fujicolor, as the boat had been christened in honor of the trek's chief sponsor, had become a major attraction. The crossbars had been set, the wings had been placed and the double-layer trampoline, which would sandwich the bag of plastic-coated maps, was stretched between the hulls. They raised the mast, fixed the shrouds and backstays and tied the ARGOS beacon, an emergency locator, to the back of the trampoline. They fixed an inflatable mattress across the boat along with a plastic sheet to be used for the protection of the sailor at rest. As they readied themselves, tourists snapped photos and asked dozens of questions. Most centred on the Seagold desalinator the pair had bought from Pierre Fehlmann, the winner on uncorrected time, of the last Around the World race. They explained that the machine could produce six liters of fresh water in only one hour by pumping sea water through it.

At 8:30 on the morning of November 12, Laurent and Pradel arrived at their boat and were greeted by the staff and guests of the Meridien. They stuffed their water tight bags with food and placed them in the hulls. The food included a high-energy mix of cereals, dry fruit, cream and honey; bags of a protein drink; some cheese, a Moroccan rice dish called couscous, a  little bread, butter and even some red wine. The sextant, the two VHF radios in plastic cases, the cigarettes and lighters and other equipment were placed in another bag and attached to the trampoline opposite the inflatable mattress. Laurent and Pradel donned their equipment slowly and quietly to the sound of the beating waves. Polar underwear, dry suits with neoprene necks, ankles and wrists, were soon snug. Next, they slipped into their trapeze harnesses, life vests and neoprene boots and their sunglasses and gloves. Pradel asked for someone to help carry the boat to the water and 20 people volunteered, lifting the cat on their shoulders and walking down the beach in a slow procession. Just when the hulls touched the water, a fishing boat began to leave. It would show them the way through the reef.
The team waved a rapid au revoir and jumped aboard. Laurent took the tiller; Pradel sheeted in. They were gone.

 "The third night we passed the Cape Verde Islands," relates Laurent, "and we realized that our project was going to be much more difficult than we had thought. I began to understand that it would be torture, but it was impossible to go back. The sea was incredibly strong and there was no chance of returning. But then, we had never even thought about abandoning. When we left the beach at N'Gor, the sea immediately became very strong. We met strong winds, high, but negotiable waves and heavy swells caused by the north wind. During the first night, the waves came from all directions. Steering was difficult. The night was so black that we could not see the bows three meters in front of us. A lot of concentration was required to feel from where the next weird wave would arrive. We saw a cargo ship far away and I directed the beam  of my flashlight onto the sail. This was the only boat we were to see during the entire passage. Aside from that ship we saw an old drifting can; that's it.

 "We tried everything to sleep," says Laurent. "We changed the position of the mattress so that we could put our heads under the shelter. Impossible. After three nights we were so fatigued that we fell asleep in spite of everything but we were at the extreme limit of exhaustion. Each time a wave came over, the one at rest was drowned under a meter of water. This lasted several seconds. At the end of the first week, we got upright without really waking up and held onto the shrouds, searching for air. Even between the waves, we had the feeling of being in a drum with people beating on it.

The heavily loaded trampoline was so near to the water surface that the sea was beating from above and below with incredible power. Meanwhile, followers in France and in Guadeloupe followed the progress of the boat by tracking the ARGOS signal sent out by the team's beacon. Supporters estimated their speed at seven knots, slow for the Hobie l8 and two seasoned sailors.  What they discovered was that a week of heavy storm activity in the North Atlantic was driving large swells into the small catamaran nearly 2,000 miles away. "in waves that never seemed to end, we passed a sort of tropical tornado," says Laurent. "it was a black cloud like ink above a white column that rose above the sea. When night came, I asked Daniel not to sleep. The first wave ran toward us, and I've never seen a bigger one. It had to have been more than ten meters. The wind  increased to 60 knots and we hauled down all the sails. Despite that, the boat was surfing like crazy. I couldn't control it anymore. When we saw this, we just said 'Looks like this will be the toughest night.' "During the storm a wave struck and I got up but was still under water. In fact, the whole boat was under two meters of water for about ten seconds. When I emerged, I  shouted at Daniel but got nothing. I thought he was swept away! But the noise ,, was so intense that even though he was I just a few feet away from me, he couldn't hear. Even he, on top of the Magnum I wings, had a hard time keeping his head above water. After that, when it would happen again, our only check was OK?' and when the other replied OK,' one could go back to sleep. The next day, there was no wind at all, but the waves were still there. In the morning I could not wake Daniel. He was dreaming of having breakfast on the terrace of a bistro at Toulon.

Two Hundred Pumps for One Glass of Water
We talked a lot about food," continues Laurent. "We were always hungry. Then we discovered another problem: thirst. Pumping the desalinator took superhuman efforts. On the beach at N'Gor, we described to our fans what the Seagold could do. While it was true that the water was good, Daniel had to pump 200 times to squeeze the equivalent of one glass of water out of it. Each time, we had to take the daggerboard out of the windward hull, install the filter in the daggerboard case, put the outlet tube into the mouth of the one to drink, then start pumping. We had two glasses of water per day, one in the morning and one in the evening and that amounted to 800 pump strokes. On top of that we had to use fresh water to dissolve the Substi 500, a highly enriched protein powder. We had five bags a day of that. "Daniel pumped for the whole passage. I tried it once but it was too tough for me and I told him I was going to give up drinking. He waited several hours. I gritted my teeth and he finally went on passing me the tube."

 But while Pradel was left to do most of the water pumping, Laurent tackled the tough job of driving the boat. "We were always in danger of capsizing even when we reefed the main and rolled the jib," says Pradel. "That would have been a catastrophe; our boat was overloaded with 100 kilos of tools, equipment, food and instruments. Even without the load we had some difficulties in our righting tests in the smooth waters of the Bay of Hyeres in France. There were a couple of times in the Atlantic when we both thought "This is the end."


 Laurent agrees that the sea had become their enemy. "From the beginning, we encountered only a stormy, disordered sea that pushed the boat in all directions. The noise was very loud and the absence of any rhythm prevented us from getting accustomed to it. The nights were the toughest moments. When I saw twilight arrive at about six, it was like a nightmare repeating itself. I was not keen to go through what I did the night before. Daniel, who needs 12 hours of sleep a day on land, whereas I need very few, was better off during the nights. We learned a lot from each other. Because of our spirit for survival, we never lost hope.


"When I saw Daniel looking wild after he missed an object, could not co-ordinate his movements, did not understand what I was telling him, or when he had problems moving on the trampoline, I reduced the speed of the boat and waited for him to come back to reality. 'At the beginning we were both sea sick. He was a little worse off than me; I had a fixed scopoderm behind my ear-a gadget that proved pretty effective. Daniel let me steer and that reduced the sickness since I had to concentrate on things other than the nausea. He stayed on the trampoline operating the desalinator, preparing the meals, controlling the sails. He took care of me. I tried to do the same for him, so I steered hours and hours as best I could."    


Food also presented unexpected problems for the pair. According to Laurent,  both men were reluctant to eat the food concentrates from the tubes and the slabs of high energy cereal mix. Still, says Laurent, ‘After four days on the water, our revulsion against the food out of the tubes was gone, but it was dangerous preparing it. We first had to find the pliers in the bag attached to the trampoline. When we opened the bag, the waves flooded it with water. When we closed it again, we had to open the hull covers - between waves and had to find the food. Then we had to close the hulls, put the pliers back and finally pump the water for the Substi 500. We had three flavors: coffee, vegetable and vanilla. We never had enough water, so the drinks were always too strong and made us nauseous, although the vanilla flavor wasn't too bad.


"If you had the chance to grab one, the feast began. "Even dissolving the food was a problem. We had shakers with us with screw-on covers and we had glued straps to them, but they were torn off despite the reputation of the glue we had used. I lost one after the other, washed away by the waves while we ate and when we lost the last one, it was a catastrophe. Fortunately, Daniel had a stroke of genius. We took the case of a flashlight (which was supposedly waterproof but failed anyway) and poured the powder and water into that. We stirred with our fingers and ate. After a few minutes, we could actually feel the energy circulating through our bodies." 


But this renewed energy wasn't enough. In fact, the two were only taking in about 500 calories a day. Malnutrition, exhaustion and constant submersion in salt water all worked against them. Every time a small cut, scrape or abrasion scarred their skin, salt water was able to enter. Soon it was infected. The constant exposure to salt water led to ulcers on ankles, feet and hands that also became infected.  "Physically, our biggest problem was the fact that we were just always soaked," says Laurent. "Everything except our watches and the Maglite was inundated.


After two days, we tried the VHF radios. They were already rusty. One day after the start, Daniel tried to fetch a cigarette, but a steep wave arrived at the same moment he opened the bag and flooded the lighters. This wasn't a big tragedy since the next day, a wave washed all our cigarettes overboard anyway. "When we each took our turn to sleep on the trampoline, we would take off our KWay overalls from Helly-Hansen - which were quite practical with their zippers everywhere, then our polar underwear, and we would wring out the water. When we pulled them on again, we thought it was sheer luxury. We had abandoned the dry suits long before because it was impossible to wear neoprene in such conditions; our ankles and wrists would just balloon. Our boots were also thrown over board because the volume of our feet had doubled and the neoprene prevented our skin from breathing. Our feet became covered with ulcers which proved worse than ankles, there was doubt that his feet could be saved. Five days later back in France, a skin graft was successful and his feet began to heal.


 Laurent, although not as severely burned, was also racked with pain. His feeling had come back as well. He did however, manage a breakfast consisting of a steak, tomatoes, two bowls of cornflakes with lots of sugar, six yogurts, a complete camembert cheese, four slices of bread and butter, croissants, other French breakfast  cakes and a platter of fruit.


Still, he could not move his limbs without extreme pain  and as the blood continued to return, the pain increased. Unfortunately for Laurent, his sailing idol, Mike Birch who had participated in the Route de Rhum race and who had helped plot their positions during the final days with his ARGOS beacon, refused to come to the Meridien Hotel at Saint Francois, to salute them. "To shake hands with him would help me more than all this medicine," said Laurent. Still, congratulatory letters, telegrams and phone calls from Europe and North America poured in by the dozens. Fujicolor waited calmly on the beach, almost mocking the sailors. It was untouched by the ordeal. Nothing was broken and it exhibited very little wear despite the bashing. Even the sails, prepared by Neil Pryde in the colors of the French and Australian flags, were in excellent condition.


Sailors even took the boat out to play in the surf while Laurent and Pradel were attempting to recover.  The two drew several lessons from their crossing The first, according to Laurent, is that "Nobody should ever try a crazy thing like that; if we had known how tough it would be, we never would have started." The second was the mutual respect needed for a crew, or anyone, to survive a long ordeal. "When I think of Daniel clinging to the trampoline, his hands and feet in the sea water. During the last few days, I couldn't prevent myself from trembling and I hid myself when I had to vomit after seeing Daniel's feet.


"Finally, on the night of Saturday, December 6, we got the feeling that we were nearing land. We could smell flowers and trees. We could see lights and cliffs. It was La Dominique, but we did not know that yet. We just spent the night on the leeward side of the island enjoying the stillness. We were very happy. It was the end and we knew that we had succeeded although we didn't know exactly where we were because it was next to impossible to tell our position with the sextant; we were too low on the water, and we bounced around too much. Finally, on Sunday morning, we arrived in Guadeloupe.


When the two sailed into the marina, it turned out that they needed a lot more help than food alone could provide. They had to be carried to a small restaurant, the Royal, where a doctor was summoned to apply first aid to their wounds while they stuffed themselves with their first full meal since the beginning of their journey. Pradel's feet, which had seldom been atop  the wings and were always submerged in salt water, were just tattered flesh. The skin was torn away over most of their surface.


Laurent had deep wounds and scars over his butt and thighs as well as craters on his feet a millimetre deep. Both men's hands were covered with wounds that had crusted and would not heal. Each cut, which never had a chance to dry and heal properly, was infected. Their circulation suffered the effects of blockage due to sitting and crouching in one position for hours on end and their hips and knees were paralyzed. Every movement brought tears to their eyes, but the worst wasn't over. They were almost in a state of shock. With their eyes glazed and the circulation problems preventing any feeling in their lower extremities, the pain was not nearly a horrible state, I remember that never as bad as it would become. Later in the evening of their first day on land, Pradel was wheeled to a restaurant to have dinner with friends while Laurent slept in his hotel room. Pradel's meal consisted of two large steaks, a plate of vegetables, noodles and six large pieces of cake. Then he too retired for the evening.


 The next day, both men could barely move. Pradel, despite being given tranquilizers, was tortured by the dressings on his feet, which began to come back to life during the night. Tears welled in his eyes for three hours. Groggy, he kept asking for someone to help him. Finally, when he managed to fall asleep, he felt himself aboard the boat, unable to stop the rolling movement or the hammering of the waves in his ears. In his dream he stretched his hand for a tool and some food only to have the waves wash them away. With infected third degree burns over his feet and during the whole trip did he once complain."
 Pradel also appreciated Laurent. "Tony is a much better driver than I am. I don't know anybody else who's able to steer 18 hours a day in such high, vicious waves." Finally, the two learned that even if the boat, rigging and the sails were able to stand up to the punishment, the critical points such as clothing and survival equipment need a lot more preparation and careful thought. Improvements need to be made.


 Naturally, the first few days after landing, both said they would never try such a feat again. But Pradel, who is mounting a Tornado effort for the 1988 Olympics, began to state that he wanted to sail in the 1987 single-hand Figaro race and Laurent began to talk of racing Formula 40 catamarans in offshore grand prix events.   Despite their injuries, the sea had not lost it's allure.

 

Hobie MultiWorlds and Hobie 16 Europeans NOR released


MultiWorlds
David Brookes, Monday, 2 February 2015

The 2015 Hobie MultiWorlds and Hobie 16 Europeans have released the Notice of Race.

The entry list is growing at what is shaping to be another great Hobie event with lots of boats and friends attending. So please enter to ensure your spot at the Hobie MultiWorlds and Hobie 16 Europeans. 

Please note that to have your entires confirmed you must transfer the money. 

Other Links
 Notice of Race web site
 Notice of Race PDF
 Entry List

 

2015 Hobie Mid-Winter East North America


2015 Hobie Mid-Winter East
David Brookes, Tuesday, 27 January 2015

Hobie Mid-Winter East
Ocean Springs Yacht Club April 10-12 2015
The regatta is open to all Hobie Cat classes.

Schedule
Thursday, April 9
3Pm-7PM Registration

Friday, April 10
9AM Registration
9:30AM Competitors Meeting
11:30AM 1st Warning Signal
6PM Dinner

Saturday, April 11
Racing continues
6PM Dinner Party

Sunday, April 12
Racing continues
2PM no warning signal after this time

Other Links
 Notice of Race

 

2015 South African Hobie 14 Championships


South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015
John Ryall, Friday, 23 January 2015

The Hobie 14 National Championships held at Knysna Yacht Club will be a regatta that will be remembered for a long time. Superb organisation by K YC, strong winds / medium winds / light winds all made up a for a memorable event. The results show that Blaine Dodds had to discard a fourth and a first ! to win the event for the umpteenth time. The truth is that he was pushed to the limit by a number of people in different races. Don Tait, William Edwards, Declan Nurse, Nic Ryall and Douglas Edwards were all ahead of Blaine in one race or another but only Douglas managed to steal a race win from the ‘Master’. It was noticeable that 6 out of the top 7 finishers were from Knysna Yacht Club with only Nic Ryall mastering the tricky tidal conditions that favoured the local sailors. Hobie Sailors are notoriously ‘Last minute dot.com’ when it comes to entering a regatta and they gave KYC a few sleepless nights before the regatta waiting to see if there would be sufficient entries. However we had a very encouraging final entry list of 22 boats from all around the country except Durban ! We welcomed Byron Ravenscroft and Mark Gale from East London and happy campers Johnnie (and Lisa) McGillivray from Port Elizabeth. It ticked all the boxes – we managed to get a development sailor on a Hobie Ben Hani (who will be keeping the one WCHCA 14 to sail in Knysna), we had both WCHCA Hobie 14’s sailing thanks to Shannon Du Plessis and as you can see from the photos even had some very good looking camp followers courtesy of Matthew Whitehead. Perhaps the overriding thing of the regatta was the number of gear failures. Most of the South African Hobie 14’s are showing their age having been made in the 70s and 80s and breakage is commonplace. Even Blaine's championship winning 14 was bought new by him in 1980 ! When the only new ‘French’ 14 in the fleet broke a shroud there were no replacement shrouds of a suitable length available as on the French boats the shrouds go to the gunwale not the sidebar. You need to thoroughly overhaul your Hobie at least two weeks before – not in the boat park before the start of the first race. You must forgive me if I have not got all the stories this time – I was very busy trying to keep my mast in an upright position !

Day 1 – Friday 16th of January

The weather forecast did not look promising with gale force winds predicted on Friday and very light winds the rest of the weekend. For once the weather forecast was correct with driving rain and SW winds of up to 48 knots coming through early in the morning. The boat park campers were driven into the Sail Loft or took refuge on William Edwards beautiful new keel boat – moored alongside for the duration of the regatta. Only one boat was blown off a trailer but no damage was done. With high tide at 12.48 it was important to get sailing on the go by 10.30 or so - the winds moderated to around 20 to 25 knots with occasional stronger gusts but fortunately the rain held off. As you can see from the results 12 sailors decided that discretion was the better part of valour for the first race (or they were still fixing their boats in the boat park) and sat the first race out. With conditions moderating for the second and third races this was reduced to 6 sailors who decided that the wind was still too strong for them. Matthew Whitehead had his mast fall down in the first race and then had the indignity of being OCS in the second race. There were a total of 5 masts that came down some more than once. William Edwards had rudder trouble with the boat he had borrowed from Tony Gradwell to replace the famous ‘Eugenie’, and was heard to say that he would never sail a 14 again. There was an excellent braai in the evening at the yacht club.

Day 2 – Saturday 16th of January

With high tide being at 13.45 on the Saturday things didn't look very promising up until just before 12 o'clock - see photos above. Gary Hubach had time to fit some rear view mirrors to his boat – as he said ‘so that he could see what Blaine was doing behind him’ ! A light southerly wind came through which continued to build throughout the afternoon up to a maximum of about 15 knots which made for ideal sailing conditions. Race officer Andrew Finn managed to get in 5 races with only the last couple of races being marred by the reappearance of sandbanks where you had previously sailed over. A sandbank at the end of the start line for races seven and eight made starting interesting to say the least. Nic Ryall had an excellent run with 3,2,3, and a 6th place his day only being marred by a main sheet traveller failing in race 7 when he was lying 3rd behind William and Blaine. Douglas Edwards managed to keep Blaine, his dad and Nic behind him to win race 6 and all the time the Knysna boys - Don Tait, Declan Nurse and Don Brink were quietly going about getting results in the top 10. Blaine and Robberg Sea Fisheries provided a mouth-watering fish braai in the evening.

Day 3 – Sunday 17th of January

KYC treated us to a champagne breakfast in the morning. Jimmy Cairns was able to show off his talents as a piper, piping in breakfast and advertising the Piping Tattoo to be held in Knysna on 28 February. As high tide was now at 14.36 and with a cut-off for racing of 15.00 it was imperative to get in races early. Race officer Andrew moved the course up towards the heads where the sandbanks were at least visable. A 5 knot current sweeping up the channel made starting interesting especially as you had to get over to the sandbank in the middle of the course as quickly as possible to avoid the tide. William Edwards took an early gamble to sail across the sand bank and was rewarded with a second place to Blaine. In the last race the surprise package was an excellent third place by Daniel Lawrence (son of Allan Lawrence - former world Hobie 14 champion) who had taken over Tony Gradwell's 14 after getting totally frustrated with the rudders on the boat that he had borrowed.

The prize giving was so slick that the results and photographs were on Facebook before the prize giving had even finished. Each of the winners was presented with a handmade wooden boat by a local artist. Klaas de Rooy won the prize for the oldest competitor and Nic Ryall the one for the first junior. Byron Ravenscroft for the noisiest sailor !

K YC is to be thanked for a very memorable event - and at the wonderful thing is that they have agreed to host the Hobie 14 nationals again next year should no one put in an opposing bid

 

 

 

Rank

Class

Sail No

Club

Helm

Age

R 1

R 2

R 3

R 4

R 5

R 6

R 7

R 8

R 9

R 10

Total

Nett

1st

H14

8008

KYC

Dodds Blaine

55

-1

1

1

1

1

-4

1

1

1

1

13

8

2nd

H14

60006

KYC

Edwards William

50

3

23

23

6

3

2

2

2

3

2

69

23

3rd

H14

60275

KYC

Tait Don

40

2

4

5

2

9

-11

3

-10

2

5

53

32

4th

H14

60466

KYC

Nurse Declan

40

4

3

2

4

5

6

9

3

-10

-10

56

36

5th

H14

60526

ZVYC

Ryall Nick

17

23

8

8

3

2

3

23

6

4

8

88

42

6th

H14

47322

KYC

Edwards Douglas

21

8

7

-12

8

4

1

6

-13

5

7

71

46

7th

H14

60437

KYC

Brink Donald

47

23

2

4

7

7

5

5

4

-18

13

88

47

8th

H14

60454

LYC

Ayres R

47

9

-12

9

12

6

7

-13

9

12

4

93

68

9th

H14

60523

LDYC

Girard Charles

38

5

5

6

10

-13

12

12

23

11

9

106

70

10th

H14

60098

ABYC

McGillivray John

40

7

6

7

-18

23

9

11

7

9

14

111

70

11th

H14

60127

LYC

Whitehead Matt

21

23

23

3

13

8

23

7

12

8

16

136

90

12th

H14

60534

TCC

White Douglas

16

6

10

11

-16

14

14

14

8

-15

15

123

92

13th

H14

47381

FHBSC

Cairns Jim

61

23

9

10

-21

12

13

10

11

17

17

143

99

14th

H14

60382

BRYC

Ravenscroft Byron

28

23

23

23

5

18

8

4

23

13

6

146

100

15th

H14

69666

PYC

Hubach Gary

47

23

23

23

11

23

10

8

5

14

12

152

106

16th

H14

77

TSC

de Rooy Klaas

71

23

23

23

14

10

23

23

15

6

11

171

125

17th

H14

60418

ELYC

Gale Mark

38

23

11

23

15

15

18

18

14

19

21

177

131

18th

H14

63180

FHBSC

Ryall John

61

23

23

23

17

17

23

15

16

7

19

183

137

19th

H14

604404

KYC

Gradwell Tony

50

23

23

23

9

11

16

16

23

23

23

190

144

20th

H14

60440

FBYC

Lawrence Daniel

19

23

23

23

19

23

15

17

23

23

3

192

146

21st

H14

60525

ZYC

Ilgner Hartmut

57

23

23

23

20

16

17

19

17

20

18

196

150

22nd

H14

41273

KYC

Hani Bhekumuzi

18

23

23

23

22

23

23

20

18

16

20

211

165

 

Other Links
 Knysna Yacht Club Facebook with more photos


South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

South African Hobie 14 nationals 2015

Blaine Dodds winner of 2015 South African Hobie 14 nationals

Blaine and William (on left) at the 1979 Hobie 14 Worlds Plettenberg Bay RSA
 

North American Hobie 18,20 Tiger and Wild Cat Championships cancelled


Before and After
David Brookes, Tuesday, 20 January 2015

The 2015 Hobie 18, 20, and Tiger/Wildcat North Americans have been canceled! This is not another postponement, they are canceled.
Plans are being finalized for the following contingencies:
Hobie 18 NAC will be combined with the Hobie 17 NAC in Clear Lake, IA June 8 - 12, 2015
Hobie 20 NAC will be combined with the Hobie 16 NAC in Pensacola, FL September 20 - 25, 2015.

This is due to the drought in California. 

A new event will will be announced soon.

 

 

Hobie Cat Announces Videos Produced by Gary Jobson


2015 Hobe 16 North Americans
Rich McVeigh, Tuesday, 20 January 2015

Oceanside, California – January 20, 2015 - Hobie® sailing - fun, familiar places, new places, old friends, new friends, and memories  - of fun times with people who share a love of the class. The International Hobie Class Association, the Hobie Class Association of North America and Hobie Cat® World Wide announce the release of two videos produced by Gary Jobson that document Hobie sailing and the “Hobie Way of Life”.   http://www.hobiecat.com/hobie-cat-racing/

“Defining a Hobie Cat sailor is easy.  These are passionate sailors who know how to work hard, and play hard.   Our film crew was invited to the recent North American Championship to document this enduring class.  Sailors from across North America spent five days racing in a wide variety of wind conditions, spending their precious vacation time socializing and racing hard.  Many sailors referred to the class as “family.”   I find the culture in the class to be uplifting.  The veteran sailors were always available to help the less experienced. One sailor remarked, “The stronger the competition, the better the sailor I become.”   The list of competitors ranged in age from 15 to 75.  The interviews with the sailors tell the story of why so many are attached to the Hobie way of life.  The Hobie Cat is a boat that was first introduced in 1968 and continues to provide great racing and great events.  We hope our videos inspires many new sailors to join one of the Hobie Classes.” Gary Jobson

Gary Jobson is a former All-American collegiate sailor. He won the America's Cup in 1977, as tactician for Ted Turner. Also a broadcaster/producer,  ESPN's Sailing Analyst, lecturer,  writer and  Editor at Large for Sailing World and Cruising World magazines.  Jobson is the pre-eminent ambassador for sailing in the U.S.  He is a former President of US Sailing and current Vice President of the International Sailing Federation (ISAF). http://www.jobsonsailing.com

The International Hobie Class Association (IHCA) is the governing class association for all the Hobie Classes. The IHCA ensures fairness of racing by having the same class rules for all competitors around the world. The  one design class rules allow very limited changes to the boat so the best sailor not the best equipment wins.

Since 1950, Hobie has been in the business of shaping a unique lifestyle based around fun, water, and innovative quality products. From their headquarters in Oceanside, California, Hobie Cat Company manufactures, distributes, and markets an impressive collection of eco-sensitive watercraft worldwide, with subsidiaries; Hobie Cat Australasia, in Huskisson, NSW, Australia and Hobie Cat Europe, in Toulon, France and independent distributors; Hobie Kayak Europe and Hobie Cat Brazil. These products include an ever-expanding line of recreation and racing sailboats, pedal-driven and paddle sit-on-top recreation and fishing kayaks, inflatable kayaks, fishing boats and stand-up paddleboards, plus a complementary array of parts and accessories.  http://www.hobiecat.com

 

 

Other Links
 Hobie Cat racing page

 

HCANA announces the dates for the North American Championships for Hobie 17, Hobie Wave, Hobie 14 and Hobie 16


HCANA logo
David Brookes, Friday, 16 January 2015

The Hobie Class Association of North America have announced the follwoing North American Championships.

Hobie 17 North Americans
-          June 8 – 12, 2015             Clear Lake Yacht Club, Clear Lake, Iowa
 
Hobie Youth Wave North Americans
-          June 26 – 28, 2015           Sun Sand Point, Seattle, Washington
 
Hobie 14 North Americans
-          August 21 – 23, 2015       Mississauga Sailing Club, Ontario, Canada
 
Hobie 16 North Americans      Pensacola Yacht Club,
-   September 20 – 25, 2015

More details as they are announced. 

 

Hobie Dragoon Charter boats for 2015 Hobie MultiWorlds


MultiWorlds
David Brookes, Wednesday, 14 January 2015

Hobie Cat Europe has made some Hobie Dragoon charter boats available for the 2015 Hobie MultiWorlds. 

Please fill out the form and send to Hobie Cat Europe to ensure your Hobie Dragoon for the 2015 Hobie MultiWorlds at Lake Garda.

Thank you to Hobie Cat Europe for making charter boats available for the MutliWorlds. 

Other Links
 Hobie Dragoon Charter form
 Hobie MultiWorlds web site

 

Hobie Cat Europe Charter boat program 2015 Multi-Worlds & H16 Europeans


MultiWorlds
Hobie Cat Europe, Thursday, 11 December 2014

Important notice

The charter boats are reserved in priority to overseas competitors, members of a national Hobie Class Association, who will send their application form with full payment (charter fee+transport) before the 31st of April 2015. No charter boat will be confirmed without full payment of the fees.

Charter fees per boat (prices include VAT 22 %)

  •  Hobie16/16Spi=1075Euros
  • Hobie 14 = 690 Euros

  •  Hobie Wild Cat without spinnaker = 1 480 Euros
  •  Hobie Wild Cat with spinnaker = 1 660 Euros

The prices are per boat, and valid for the whole duration of the event.
Transport costs to the site and back to the factory to be added : 210 Euros per boat

Delivery of the boats

  •    The boats will be delivered on the 25th of July at the Hobie Sport on the beach.
  •   The competitors will have to assemble and disassemble the boats.
  •   Special arrangements will have to be made with Hobie Cat Europe in case the assembly is not possible.
  •   At the end of the event, each boat will be rinsed with fresh water, the sails taken off and rinsed, the mast will be disassemble. The whole equipment will be checked by Hobie Cat Europe before it is completely disassembled and packed for the return. After the packing the deposit will be refunded by Hobie Cat Europe. 

How to book a boat ?

  •   Payment by credit card of bank transfer. Fill in the charter form and send before the 31 of April 2015 either by fax at +33 4 94081399 or per e-mail at hobiecat@hobie-cat.net
  •  Payment by cheque : Fill in the charter form, join the cheque and send both per post before 31 of April 2015, to Hobie Cat Europe, ZI Toulon Est, CS60250, 83078 Toulon cedex 9 (for the attention of Regatta Department).

  • An order confirmation will be sent by Hobie Cat Europe upon receipt of the charter form, but no confirmation will be sent until full payment is received. 

  •  Deposit for damage or loss 
  •  A refundable deposit of 700 Euros per boat will have to be paid on site either in cash or traveler cheque before the regatta.
  •  This deposit will be paid to the Hobie Cat representative on site before the delivery of the boat and will be refunded after the regatta and after a full checking.ï‚· Only Euros will be accepted.
  •  No payment by credit card will be accepted for the deposit
  •  In case of damage or loss, the amount for repair will be taken from the deposit and the competitor will have to restore the initial amount of the deposit before starting the next race. 

Insurance

  • The sailor who charter the boat will have to give evidence of his third liability insurance before he is allowed to use the charter boat.
  • The sailor will be responsible of the boat and its equipment during the whole event. The sailor and his crew will assemble the boat before the regatta and will disassemble it after the regatta. This include to remove all stickers that will have been applied on the hulls and sails for the regatta.

  •  In case of thief, a declaration will be to be filled with the local police and signed both by the sailor or his representant and Hobie Cat representative. In this case, a forfeit of 700 Euros will be supported by the sailors (amount of the deposit).

  • Many thanks to Hobie Cat Europe for the ongoing support in making the charter boats available. 

Other Links
 Application form

 

Hobie 16 Pre Europeans Clinic


Hobie 16 Pre Europeans clinic
David Brookes, Sunday, 7 December 2014

Take the unique opportunity to take part at this international Hobie training camp on Lake Garda, Malcesine prior the 2015 Hobie Europeans trained by appointed Hobie coach Lamberto Cesari and Heinz Stickl Operating Manager of Stickl Sportcamp.

Hobie training camp will be organized from 29th March until 1st April 2015

Participants from all countries are very well welcomed
Location: Hobie Stickl Sportcamp in Malcesine (across Campione) on Lake Garda
Coaches: Lamberto Cesari and Heinz Stickl
Getting there: low cost airlines to Verona or Milano/Bergamo and transfers to the Sportcamp
Training on the waters of Campione for the 2015 HOBIE Europeans
 Program:

Arriving on Saturday 28th March in Hotel Rosa right at the beach next to the Sportcamp

4 days Hotel including half-board
4 days fullday training with Lamberto and Heinz
9 available Hobie 16’s in perfect regatta shape ‘‘ready-to-go’’
Price: min. 670 € - max. 740 € depending on rooms

Reservation: deadline 15.02.2015

Stickl Sportcamp

37018 Malcesine

Via Gardesana 144 b

info@stickl.com
www.stickl.com

 

2014 Open Danish Hobie Cat 16 Nationals concluded


2014 Open Danish Nationals HC16 SPI winners
DHCA, Monday, 15 September 2014

Svendborg Sunds Sejlklub 13-14 September

This years Danish Nationals were held at picturesque Svendborg Sound. Saturday with lots of sun saw winds blowing 12-16 knots from a northeasterly direction increasing Sunday to 15-20 knots in a more gray weather setting.

A combination of land-effect, current and a shifty breeze provided the competitors quite challenging conditions in both tactics and boat handling.

The Nationals were held in HC16 Classic and HC16 SPI. Eight teams from Germany took the way up and gave the event a bit of interantional glory and not least very qualified competition to the Danes! :-)

Hobie Cat 16 Classic winners:
1. Christoph Beinlich / Felicitas Franke (GER)
2. Jens Reimers / Nina Reimers (GER)
3. Thorben Wolkowski / Neele  Wolkowski (GER)

Hobie Cat 16 SPI winners:
1. Daniel Bjørnholt / Josephine Frederiksen (DEN)
2. Nicolaj Bjørnholt / Nicklas Heide (DEN)
3. Kerstin Wichardt / Sarah Schütte (GER)

Hobie Cat 16 SPI - Danish Sailing medal winners:
Gold: Daniel Bjørnholt / Josephine Frederiksen 
Silver: Nicolaj Bjørnholt / Nicklas Heide 
Bronze: Benjamin Böhme / Martin Schwensen

Hobie Cat "Action" trophy winners:
Petra Jørs / Emilie Arntoft (DEN)

Please find full results and pics below.

Other Links
 Results HC16 SPI
 Results HC16 Classic
 Pictures (on FB)


2014 Open Danish Nationals HC16 Classic wiiners

2014 Open Danish Nationals HC16 SPI - Danish Sailing medal winners

2014 Open Danish Nationals HC16 - "Hobie Action Trophy" winners